杭州龙凤,杭州桑拿论坛,杭州楼凤夜生活

Powered by Liangn!

March, 2019

Police investigating torched cars in west-end Toronto – Toronto

Watch above: What are police saying after multiple arsons in a west-end neighbourhood? Mark Carcasole reports

TORONTO – Police are investigating after eight cars were torched in west-end Toronto overnight.

Fire crews responded to a used car lot on Toro Road near Finch Ave. W. and Keele St. just after 2:30 a.m to find several vehicles engulfed in flames.

No injuries were reported and there’s no word yet on any arrests.

Andy O’Connor, the owner of nearby business Gottesman Signs, said area residents are used to crime.

“I’m not surprised at all. Not in this neighbourhood,” he said. “A lot of that stuff goes down here.  We’ve had cars on fire behind our shop before, we’ve had cars broken into and smashed up.”

The incident comes a day after several other cars were set on fire in the Jane St. and Wilson Ave. area early Sunday morning.

However police weren’t willing to link the two incidents.

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

Related

  • Several vehicles set on fire in Jane and Wilson area

  • Multiple cars destroyed by fire in Moore Park neighbourhood

  • Police seek ‘person of interest’ in multi-vehicle arson investigation

Firefighters were called to a number of homes where crews found the vehicles in flames on some driveways.

Police say a total of seven cars were damaged. Anyone with information is urged to call police.

Meanwhile, investigators are still on the search for an arsonist that destroyed multiple vehicles in an upscale Toronto neighbourhood in May.

Police have released a security video of a “person of interest” in the case.

Spain imports experimental Ebola drug to treat priest – National

MADRID, Spain – Spain has imported a U.S.-made experimental Ebola drug to treat a Spanish missionary priest evacuated from Liberia last week after testing positive for the killer virus.

The Health Ministry announced Monday that the ZMapp drug, made by Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. of San Diego, was obtained in Geneva this weekend and brought to Madrid to treat Miguel Pajares. The 75-year-old priest was placed in isolation Thursday at Madrid’s Carlos III Hospital.

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

Related

  • Won’t be the last time patient tested for Ebola, hospital official

  • 25 years ago, Ebola outbreak in U.S. introduced us to unknown disease

  • Ebola: What the WHO’s international health emergency declaration means

  • WHO: Ebola outbreak is a public health emergency

There is no known cure or licensed treatment for Ebola, which has killed more than 1,000 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. The World Health Organization has called the Ebola outbreak – which emerged in Guinea in March and has since spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone and possibly Nigeria – an international health emergency and urged nations worldwide to donate resources to battle the disease.

READ MORE: Ebola outbreak disrupts business and hurts local economy

The ethical questions surrounding experimental Ebola drugs and vaccines were being debated Monday during a teleconference of medical ethicists and other experts organized by the U.N. health agency.

Two Americans diagnosed with Ebola in Liberia and evacuated back to the United States have been treated with the drug. One of them, Dr. Kent Brantly, said last week that his condition was improving and the husband of the aid worker being treated with Brantly said the same thing. Both are in isolation at an Atlanta hospital.

Spain said it obtained permission from the laboratory developing the drug and, under an agreement between WHO and the Doctors Without Borders charity group, imported the drug from Geneva where it said a dose had been available. The ministry said Spain sought the drug under legislation permitting use of unauthorized medication in patients suffering from a life-threatening illness who cannot be treated satisfactorily with any authorized drug.

READ MORE: Won’t be the last time patient tested for Ebola, hospital official

Despite Spain’s statement, WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl told The Associated Press on Monday that the U.N. agency had no role in helping Spain obtain the experimental drug.

At least one country in West Africa has expressed interest in the experimental drug. Nigeria’s health minister, Onyenbuchi Chukwu, said last week he had asked U.S. health officials about access but was told the manufacturer would have to agree.

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said “there are virtually no doses available,” a CDC spokesman said last week, before the announcement that Spain was also using the drug.

Because the ZMapp drug has never been tested in humans, scientists say there’s no way to tell if it has made any difference to the two American aid workers who have so far received it.

The drug is a mixture of three antibodies engineered to recognize Ebola and bind to infected cells so the immune system can kill them. Scientists culled antibodies from laboratory mice and ZMapp’s maker now grows the antibodies in tobacco plants and then purifies them. It takes several months to even produce a modest amount of the drug.

READ MORE: Nigeria declares national state of emergency over Ebola

Nigerian health authorities, meanwhile, confirmed another Ebola case Monday, a nurse who was treating Patrick Sawyer, the Liberian-American who flew into the country with the disease and died of it last month. That brings the locally confirmed Ebola cases in Nigeria to 10, including two who have died, Sawyer and another nurse. Nigerian authorities have 177 contacts of Sawyer now under surveillance.

WHO has not yet confirmed the Ebola cases in Nigeria.

©2014The Canadian Press

Ukraine crisis: Rocket attack leads to mass jail breakout – National

DONETSK, Ukraine – Rockets slammed into a high-security prison Monday in the rebel-held city of Donetsk, igniting a riot that allowed more than 100 prisoners to flee, authorities in eastern Ukraine said.

Donetsk city council spokesman Maxim Rovinsky said a direct rocket hit killed at least one inmate and left three others severely wounded. In the chaos, he said 106 prisoners escaped, included some jailed for murder, robbery and rape.

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

In the past week Ukrainian government forces have intensified their military operations and surrounded Donetsk, the largest city in rebel-held eastern Ukraine. Exchanges of rocket fire and deaths from shelling have become a feature of daily life and hundreds of thousands have chosen to flee.

The prison break became possible after a substation providing the building with electricity was damaged, disabling the facility’s alarm system.

“Extremely dangerous prisoners are now free. It is hard to know the extent of threat this poses to the city, which is flooded with weapons,” Rovinsky said.

Rebels routinely accuse government forces of using heavy artillery in their campaign to retake Donetsk.

But Ukrainian security spokesman Andriy Lysenko blamed the prison strike on separatist fighters.

“Bandits in Donetsk shelled residential quarters and correctional facility No. 124,” he said.

Prisoners said the rocket hit their building late Sunday night.

“At around 10 p.m., after lights went out and the prisoners began heading to their sleeping quarters, a rocket hit this place,” said one prisoner, who gave his name as Vova Kordemansky. “Nobody was in this room, but one guy downstairs had his head blown off.”

Officials with Ukraine’s state penitentiary service said later Monday that 34 prisoners had returned to the jail. It was not immediately possible to verify that claim.

One of the prisoners who had apparently returned to the prison told The Associated Press that inmates were forced to flee to avoid incoming rockets, but were apprehended in a nearby neighbourhood.

Both Ukrainian government forces and the pro-Russian rebels who want independence for their eastern region have deployed heavy and often imprecise weapons in the battle that began in April. Apartments and other civilian buildings have frequently been hit, adding to the mounting death toll among civilians.

Rovinsky said Monday at least 10 homes, shops and garages were hit by overnight rockets. He added that 20,000 people had no electricity in Donetsk and an estimated 400,000 have fled the city, which had a pre-war population of 1 million. Many shops have closed and supplies are dwindling at the few still open.

Local authorities have attempted to continue providing basic services, such as trash removal and a skeleton bus service.

The Ukrainians army’s strategy has focused on encircling Donetsk and nearby rebel towns and breaking off road links with other separatist towns and villages further east, closer to the Russian border.

Many of those in Russian-speaking eastern Ukraine distrust the new central government in Kyiv, which came to power after the February ouster of former President Viktor Yanukovych, whose power base was in eastern Ukraine.

Fighting began a month after Russia annexed Ukraine’s peninsula of Crimea in March.

Associated Press writer Peter Leonard in Kyiv, Ukraine, contributed to this report.

©2014The Canadian Press

Illegal parking next to Toronto fire hydrants a cash cow for the city – Toronto

ABOVE: How has this one fire hydrant made the City of Toronto almost $300,000?

OTTAWA – It’s the street equivalent of a desert mirage, an elusive piece of prime parking real estate that, for some strange reason, everyone else just happened to miss.

Eventually, however, a telltale slip of paper tucked beneath a windshield wiper offers an explanation: you parked in front of a fire hydrant.

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

Maybe it was an honest mistake. Or maybe you thought you could slip in and out before your illegal parking job caught the attention of a passing bylaw officer. Either way, now you’ve been hit with a hefty fine.

And as it turns out, some hydrants seem to be more tempting – and more costly – than others.

In Toronto, one hydrant stands above the rest. People are fined so often for parking in front of it that on Google’s Street View, a white Toyota can be seen with a yellow slip under its wiper blade as a parking-enforcement officer walks away.

Since 2008, cars that parked too close to the hydrant at 393 University Ave. have been ticketed 2,962 times. Those fines add up to $289,620 – more than any other hydrant in the city.

So, why is this one particular hydrant such a cash cow for the city? There are a few possible explanations. It’s right by the courthouse and near a major downtown intersection. The hydrant itself is in the middle of a busy sidewalk set back some distance from the street, and it would be easy enough for drivers to miss. No markings on the street make it obvious that the spot is off-limits.

Anthony Fabrizi, the city’s manager of parking ticket operations, says the hydrant needs to be a certain distance from the street so pumper trucks can park there.

“There’s lots of logic to the madness when you see behind the scenes,” Fabrizi said.

The fire hydrant located at 393 University Avenue in Toronto is pictured on Thursday, August 7, 2014.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

In Toronto, the fine for parking within three metres of a fire hydrant is $100. It used to be $30 until the city hiked the fine in early 2008.

A Canadian Press analysis of Toronto’s parking-ticket data found the city has collected more than $24 million since 2008 by fining people who parked too close to hydrants.

Fabrizi says all parking fines, including those from parking next to hydrants, add up to $80 million a year.

That may seem like a big number, but Fabrizi says it only represents about one per cent of the money needed to run all of the city’s programs.

“The amount of revenue that parking generates is so minuscule compared to the overall revenue that it really doesn’t serve a great purpose as a revenue generator.”

About half the revenue from parking tickets pays for parking enforcement and operations, he added.

“Parking is a bit of a funny business in terms of budgeting,” Fabrizi said.

“We have to budget in terms of firm numbers the costs associated with enforcing parking. So we know that there’s about a $50-million cost … so that is a $50-million budget that has to be paid even if no parking tickets were issued.

“Historically, we see that parking tickets and fines, once it goes through the courts, generate about $80 million a year. So the program pays for itself and then there’s a little bit of a margin, about $30 million extra.”

Most parking tickets in Toronto are handed out to people who let their parking meters expire or who park in no-parking areas. Tickets for parking too close to fire hydrants only accounted for 1.45 per cent of all parking infractions last year.

While the hydrant at 393 University Ave. is by far the city’s golden goose, many others are also quite lucrative.

At 33 Elmhurst Ave., a hydrant lurks in the shadow of a large condo building in North York. Vehicles that parked there have been ticketed 2,253 times since 2008, with fines totalling $207,030.

A nearby federal government building may explain all the parking tickets. The Joseph Shepard building houses branches of Passport Canada, a Canadian Forces recruiting centre and several other federal departments.

If you’re visiting Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery, don’t park in front of the fire hydrant at 113 Merton St. This unassuming hydrant, tucked between two trees, is the city’s third most-ticketed spot, with 2,165 fines handed out amounting to $212,300.

The city also tracks the province or state on the licence plates of people who get fined for parking too close to hydrants. Not surprisingly, almost every ticketed vehicle had Ontario plates. Drivers with Quebec plates were a distant second, followed by visitors from New York and Alberta.

But pity the two poor drivers with Hawaiian plates, who came a long way only to get busted for parking in front of hydrants.

TOP 10 most lucrative Toronto hydrants:

1. 393 University Ave., $289,620
2. 112 Merton St., $212,300
3. 33 Elmhurst Ave., $207,030
4. 56 The Esplanade, $191,110
5. 5519 Yonge St., $173,330
6. 99 Atlantic Ave., $163,760
7. 361 University Ave., $152,530
8. 43 Elm St., $152,220
9. 5100 Yonge St., $145,310
10. 6 Spring Garden Ave., $131,110

Source: City of Toronto

How Canadians are avoiding paying taxes on tax-free savings accounts

OTTAWA – A tricky rule keeps tripping up thousands of Canadians who make withdrawals from their tax-free savings accounts, and replace the money too early.

Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSA) allow Canadians age 18 and over to save money in a certain dollar amount each calendar year. Federal benefits and credits aren’t impacted, and all income earned and withdrawn is generally tax-free, as long as you follow the rules.

Story continues below

HangZhou Night Net

Related

  • 5 dos and don’ts of tax-free savings accounts

    RRSP or TFSA? Put money into both if you have the means, experts say

  • Tips for paying off your debt and saving for the future

  • Canadians with kids ‘just getting by’ financially: poll

  • How parents can help save for their child’s post-secondary education

  • No RESP? How to manage (and avoid) student debt

READ MORE: 5 dos and don’ts of tax-free savings accounts

Some 54,700 taxpayers got warning packages from the Canada Revenue Agency earlier this year about the problem affecting the 2013 taxation year, and were told they face a penalty.

The number has been dropping steadily from a peak of 103,000 in 2010, but still represents a persistent misunderstanding of TFSA rules even as the agency and financial institutions step up education measures.

The regulations say that account holders can put back the amounts they withdraw from a TFSA only in a later calendar year. Doing so in the same calendar year exposes them to a tax hit for overcontributions, even though they’re only replacing the withdrawn funds.

By the end of 2013, some 10.7 million Canadians had opened a TFSA, a savings vehicle introduced by the Conservative government in 2009 that allows money to grow inside tax-free with no income-tax hit on withdrawal.

READ MORE: How parents can help save for their child’s post-secondary education

The popular savings tool cost the federal treasury some $410 million in forgone taxes in 2013, or more than a billion dollars over its first five years.

Some taxpayers are apparently slow to absorb the finicky withdrawal rule: this year 11,260 of them got the same warning package from the Canada Revenue Agency last year as well, figures provided by CRA show.

As of the end of last month, the agency had waived penalties for more than 17,000 Canadians who broke the rule in 2012. The average penalty waived was $516, or a total of almost $9 million.

And for the 2013 taxation year, more than 20,000 Canadians have already paid their penalties.

Taxpayers who received a TFSA warning package in the mail this summer were given 60 days to respond. Those who don’t respond get a notice of assessment, imposing a penalty.

READ MORE: Tips for paying off your debt and saving for the future

A spokesman for the agency said the onus is on Canada’s banks and other financial institutions to make sure their customers know the rules.

“As with any financial or investment product, financial institutions have a responsibility to inform their clients of the details and restrictions relating to TFSAs,” said Philippe Brideau.

“The CRA continues to work very closely with the financial institutions to ensure that CRA information related to TFSA is well understood and known by the Canadian financial sector.”

Brideau noted that fewer than half a per cent of TFSA holders ran afoul of the rules in 2013.

The current maximum annual contribution to a tax-free savings account is $5,500, though Prime Minister Stephen Harper has promised to double the maximum once the federal books are balanced, expected next year in advance of the scheduled 2015 federal election.

A special analysis in 2012 by the Finance Department found that the savings vehicle is more popular among higher income and older Canadians.

©2014The Canadian Press